Addressing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women & People in Southern California

This project aims to generate a clear and thorough understanding of the scale and dynamics of cases of trafficked, missing, and murdered Native American women and children in Southern California, and design and implement a pilot blueprint for tribes to intervene in and prevent such cases. Though each law enforcement agency may have documentation of such cases in each of their respective jurisdictions, no such information exists in an accessible, comprehensive cross-jurisdictional data set. Moreover, many agencies lack thorough information, as much of this violence goes unreported and undocumented, and can fall through gaps in communication and bureaucracy. This project aims to identify those gaps and collect data on this violence, and create a path forward in empowering tribes to enact effective, data-driven policies to address trafficking and MMIWG in their regions.

The report will be published in December 2021 and focuses on the southern portion of California, defined as all lands south of San Francisco and Sacramento, and north of the border with Mexico. 

WE ARE CURRENTLY SEEKING INPUT FROM CALIFORNIA MMIWP FAMILIES, INDIGENOUS SURVIVORS, & PROFESSIONAL STAKEHOLDERS.
PARTICIPATE IN A SURVEY OR SIGN UP TO BE INTERVIEWED TODAY! 

ABOUT THE RESEARCHERS

This project is a collaboration between the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and Sovereign Bodies Institute. Key researchers on the project include Dr. Blythe George, and SBI's Annita Lucchesi & Trish Martinez

BLYTHE GEORGE

Blythe George is a member of the Yurok Tribe, and earned her PhD from Harvard University in 2020. Blythe graduated from Dartmouth College in 2012 with a BA in Sociology, and in 2014, Blythe received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship for her Masters’ project, where she examined the intersection of unemployment, gender, and crime on the Yurok and Hoopa Valley reservations, located in Northern California. For her dissertation, Blythe uses in-depth interviews and ethnographic observation on the Yurok and Hoopa Valley reservations to document the effects of prisoner re-entry on the reservation communities of Hoopa and Klamath.  Blythe’s dissertation was awarded a 2018 NSF Sociology Program Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement grant, and has been supported by the Social Science Research Council’s Mellon Mays Initiatives, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, the Harvard University Native American Program, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Association for American Indian Affairs, and Indigenous Education, Inc.

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