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TRISH MARTINEZ

Southern California Advocate

Trish Martinez is a Professional Specialist with AT&T Infrastructure Planning & Optimization. Her 35+ year career includes extensive experience in project management, process improvement, Root Cause Analysis, and most notably recognized as a multi-award-winning training manager responsible for territories across the United States and Puerto Rico. While most people may hang their hat on occupational milestones, Trish Martinez’s personal passions and pursuits for equality, justice and community fuel her desire to advocate for the disenfranchised, the abused and forgotten on and off tribal lands.
 

Trish is a Diegueño and Yaqui Native American and is a citizen of the Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians of San Diego County in California. As a Native American, she is considered a trailblazer both within tribal communities and beyond. She serves as her Tribal Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Representative and was a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for native children and survivors of Human Trafficking in the Foster Care system. Trish is a member of Women of AT&T, a network of more than 90,000 promoting community awareness of Human Trafficking and Child Sex Trafficking and
Exploitation. In this capacity she was appointed as Native Liaison to the San Diego Human Trafficking Advisory Council.

 

Lastly, Trish’s advocacy and dedication to prevent HT/CSEC has quickly advanced her into an international community speaking at the March 2017 United Nations: 61st Commission on the Status of Women: Human Trafficking in Native Country. She is now part of a movement with other anti- trafficking advocacy groups, focused on Gender Equality, Decent Work & Economic Growth and Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions.
 

Trish Martinez is an example of how individuals can help mobilize others to become filled with renewed hope, addressing human rights violations happening in their communities, region and nation.
 

“We need to raise awareness of our multicultural communities, so we can better understand and strive to find positive opportunities for children”